Fashion and Beauty Through The Ages

Fashion and beauty trends have always gone hand-in-hand. Whenever a new major fashion trend was taking place, a new makeup trend was sure to follow. Here’s a look at the most famous moments in fashion and beauty history.

Edwardian Era
During this time, fashion was restricted to corsets and long conservative dresses; this was also the era of the hourglass figure and large hair. Ladies were still confined to being ornamental and wore little makeup. The most makeup women would wear was a bit of rouge on their cheeks and lips to give their face a bit of life, but anymore than a natural glow and women were thought of as looking like a harlot.

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Photo credit: commons.wikimedia.com
The Roaring Twenties
In the 1920s, the hair and dresses became much shorter. This was the post-war era when women became much more free and broke away from the typical ideals of feminity. The era of the Flapper was alive and well. The “Bob” became the hairstyle to have as women began to cut off their hair to cut away from the notion that real women had to have long luscious locks. Women looked to movie icons like Clara Bow and imitated her short hair and dresses that challenged the old Edwardian ideals of what it meant to be a woman. The curves of the previous era were done away with, and the ideal was to be thin; women went on crazy diets much like today.
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Photo credit: commons.wikimedia.com
Wartime Woes
World War II brought restrictions on the styles of clothing women could have as most countries, especially European countries, were under some sort of ration to accommodate for the war effort. Most clothing was utilitarian and makeup was so hard to find that many women just went on to make their own. Charcoal for eyeliner and crushed beets or rose petals were just some ways women made up for their lack of beauty supplies. In England, some women even used gravy drippings painted onto their legs to give the look of nylons. One pesky side effect of gravy nylons? Hungry dogs would chase women down the streets! However, because of such meager supplies, the rise of glamour and Hollywood began to take place during this era. Women like Veronica Lake were revered for shining some glamour and beauty onto such a dark time.
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Photo credit: commons.wikimedia.com
Hollywood Glamour Girls
Post-war brought the era of Hollywood glamour. A stark contrast from the images seen during wartime, movie star vixens allowed people to forget the gruesome memories of the past years and instead brought on a new sexier image for people to see. Marilyn Monroe epitomized the style of this era. From her famous blonde hair and red lipstick to her body hugging dresses, Monroe ushered in the era of sexy, and the idea of curves being beautiful returned. Women were donning red lipstick to accentuate their lips to go with their glamorous tight-fitting dresses that showed off their womanly figures.
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Photo credit: commons.wikimedia.com
The Swinging Sixties
Just as the Twenties got rid of the curves of the Edwardian era, the 1960s ushered in a new trend that would eliminate the curves of Marilyn Monroe. A thin model named Twiggy headed this revolutionary era. Mod was the latest trend to take over both fashion and beauty. Twiggy initiated the notion of short dresses and thin frames. She also introduced the trend of doe-like eyes by emphasizing both her her top lashes and her lower lashes. Twiggy even used to draw in lower lashes with black eyeliner to make them look fuller.

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Photo credit: Flickr.com
Saturday Night Fever Meets Hippie Chic
The Seventies was an era of two completely different trends. On one hand, natural was the trend brought in by women like Farrah Fawcett and her famous red swimsuit photo. Wearing your hair big and curly with natural looking makeup embodied the popular hippie chic look. At the same time, the glamour of disco was taking place and people donned loud fashion such as bell-bottoms and brightly colored polyester shirts. To go with the loud fashion came loud makeup with bright blue eye shadow and bright pink blush appearing on dance floors everywhere.
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Photo credit: Flickr.com
Material Girls Getting Physical
The Eighties was the era of power suits and leotards along with big hair and even bigger eyebrows. Women were dressing for their power jobs, but were also dressing to keep fit and capable of out-doing their male counterparts in just about everything. As the Western World experienced a financial and material boom, more people wore designer threads and embodied the mentality that bigger was better. They took that mentality to their beauty philosophy as well, as hair was teased within an inch of its life and celebrities like Brooke Shields and Madonna let their brows go untamed.
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Photo credit: bettysdivine.com
Minimalist Grunge
In the Eighties, musical artists such as David Bowie and Madonna blurred the lines between men and women. Androgyny became a rising trend in fashion that carried over into the Nineties. Two of the biggest fashion icons arise in this era: Kate Moss and Kurt Cobain. Moss brought in the look of androgyny and minimalism with her controversial Calvin Klein ads. Fashion and makeup took to being inspired by this minimalism, and a much more natural and relaxed look began to appear on both the catwalk and the streets. Nirvana and Kurt Cobain gained popularity for Grunge music and soon “grunge” became an entire fashion movement. Flannel shirts and ripped jeans became the go-to outfit for many.
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Photo credit: fashiongrunge.com
The New Millennium
The beginning of the 2000s saw a complete backlash at everything 90s. The new trend was inspired by futuristic fashion and metallic was everywhere from shirts and shoes to eye shadows and nail polish. However, nearing the 2010s, trends from the past began resurfacing. We saw trends from the 1970s making a comeback with the boho chic look, and the constructed shoulders and bright colors of the 1980s made an appearance as well.
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Photo credit: Fanpop.com
In today’s fashion and beauty it seems to be an “anything goes” philosophy as people wear the matte red lipstick of the 1950s with the flannel of the grunge era, proof that trends never really do fade out, they just sit in your closest until it’s time for the grand comeback.

Which era do you tend to get inspiration from for your fashion and beauty looks?

-Gretchelle

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